GMAT Verbal Practice | Sentence Correction

GMAT Sample Questions | Tenses

This GMAT sample question is a verbal sentence correction practice question testing your understanding of Tenses, Comparisons, and Usage of Words.

Question 9: Jane Austen has firmly joined Shakespeare not just as a canonical figure but also as a symbol of Literature itself - the hazel-eyed woman in the mobcap as iconic now as the balding man in the doublet.

  1. Jane Austen has firmly joined Shakespeare not just as a canonical figure but also as a symbol of Literature itself - the hazel-eyed woman in the mobcap as iconic now as the balding man in the doublet.
  2. Jane Austen is as firm a canonical figure as a symbol of literature itself, like Shakespeare; the hazel-eyed woman in the mobcap and the balding man in the doublet are both iconic.
  3. Jane Austen, the hazel-eyed woman in the mobcap, and Shakespeare, the balding man in the doublet, have firmly joined together as a canonical figure and a symbol of literature.
  4. Jane Austen is as iconic as Shakespeare; The hazel-eyed woman in the mobcap and the balding man in the doublet are not only firmly joined as canonical figures but as symbols of literature itself.
  5. Jane Austen has firmly joined Shakespeare not only as a canonical figure but also as a symbol of Literature - the hazel-eyed woman in the mobcap has been becoming as iconic now as the balding man in the doublet.

Get to Q51 in GMAT Quant


Online GMAT Course
@ INR 2500


GMAT Coaching in Chennai


Starts Thu, July 4, 2019


Explanatory Answer

Step 1 of solving this GMAT Sentence Correction Question: Identifying What Is Tested

Look for differences across the answer options to identify what is being tested in the sentence.

  • Some options are using “like” and others are using “as” to make the comparison.

  • The placement of the descriptions of Jane Austen and Shakespeare is differing in the options.

  • Some options are comparing Austen to Shakespeare and others are comparing the hazel-eyed woman to the balding man.

Step 2 of solving this GMAT Sentence Correction Question: Understanding the Sentence
  • The sentence attempts to compare Jane Austen and Shakespeare. The intent of the sentence is to say that “Like Shakespeare, Jane Austen too is a canonical figure these days”.

  • When using “like” to make a comparison, the two nouns being compared should be placed next to each other.

Step 3 of solving this GMAT Sentence Correction Question: Eliminating Options
  • In Choice (B), “like Shakespeare” is placed next to “Symbol of literature”, implying a comparison between the symbol and Shakespeare. The option also compares Jane Austen with “the symbol of literature” and not with Shakespeare.

  • Choice (C) and choice (D) use the construction “firmly joined together as” or “firmly joined as” when referencing the two authors. This seems to imply that the two have been combined into one canonical figure or stuck together like glue. The usage alters the meaning of the sentence in such a way that the sentence makes no sense.

  • The sentence is discussing a fact. The construction “has been becoming” is used to indicate an event that began happening in the past and is continuing. The tense construction in choice (E) is therefore incorrect.

Choice A is the correct answer.

 

GMAT Online Course - Quant
Try it free!

Register in 2 easy steps and
Start learning in 5 minutes!

★ Sign up for Free

Already have an Account?

★ Login to Continue

GMAT Coaching in Chennai

Next Weekday Batch
Starts Thu, July 4, 2019

★ GMAT Class Info

GMAT Coaching in Chennai

Sign up for a Free Demo of our GMAT Classes in Chennai

★ Schedule Demo


GMAT Sample Questions | Topicwise GMAT Questions


Where is Wizako located?

Wizako - GMAT, GRE, SAT Prep
An Ascent Education Initiative
48/1 Ramagiri Nagar
Velachery Taramani Link Road.,
Velachery, Chennai 600 042. India

How to reach Wizako?

Phone: (91) 44 4500 8484
Mobile: (91) 95000 48484
WhatsApp: WhatsApp Now
Email: learn@wizako.com
Leave A Message